New international research group challenges thinking on African regimes

20 Mar 2012

20 March 2012

Africa Power and Politics and the Netherlands-led research project Tracking Development have launched a collaboration to explore the policies and governance conditions that are needed if Africa is to match the economic and social achievements of Southeast Asia.

 

The new initiative, Initiating and sustaining developmental regimes in Africa (DRA), aims to contribute to better understanding on the key conditions for fast and equitable sustainable economic growth in African countries, ways of managing leadership successions, and how international conditions might become more supportive.

 

The thinking behind the collaboration is explored in two new policy briefs:

  • Policy for development in Africa: Learning from Southeast Asia, David Henley, Professor of Contemporary Indonesia Studies, University of Leiden, and Jan Kees van Donge, Africa coordinator, Tracking Development (DRA Policy Brief 1)
  • Policy and governance in Africa’s economic transformation, David Booth, Director, Africa Power and Politics and Research Fellow, Overseas Development Institute (DRA Policy Brief 2)

DRA’s starting point is research from Leiden that suggests that most of the differences in development outcomes between African cases and their Asian counterparts may be explained by the timing and sequencing of the adoption of three policy features:

  • macro-economic stability
  • pro-poor, pro-rural public spending
  • economic freedom for peasants and small entrepreneurs.

The project is supported by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs.  

 

See also: Special issue of Development Policy Review:  Tracking Development in South-East Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. The opening article of this issue, Tracking Development in South-East Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa: The Primacy of Policy by Jan Kees van Donge, David Henley and Peter Lewis is free to download at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dpr.2012.30.issue-s1/issuetoc  

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